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Git Feature Branch Workflow

Motivator It's important for a team to have an agreement on how the changes of source code should be applied.
According to projects and teams size, we will define a workflow or select one from recommended workflows; the "Feature Branch Workflow" is a candidate.
What is it? - One branch "master" for main codebase
- Several separated branches for features development
Why should we care? - Be super simple and allow each developer works on a particular feature.
- A stable codebase (master) benefits for continuous integration (CI) environment
- Leverage "Pull request" for Code review
How it works? A lifecyle of a feature branch (usually created by a story)
1. Creator creates a new branch from a story.  For example: "ABC-1-setup-projects"
2. Creator checkouts the created branch and works on the branch (commits, pushes)
3. Creator has done the feature, he uses "pull request" to merge his branch into branch "master"
4. Reviewers…
Recent posts

The 2017 Scrum Guide, and My Notes

https://www.scrum.org Scrum is not only designed for software development Scrum can be used for addressing any complex issues:
1. Research and identify viable markets, technologies, and product capabilities;
2. Develop products and enhancements;
3. Release products and enhancements, as frequently as many times per day;
4. Develop and sustain Cloud (online, secure, on-demand) and other operational environments for product use; and,
5. Sustain and renew products.
Scrum Values is a key factor for building trust and respect among team members The five values are:
1. Commitment
2. Courage
3. Focus
4. Openness
5. Respect
Daily Scrum's questions are more focused on inspection and adaption rather than the status 1. What did I do yesterday that helped the Development Team meet the Sprint Goal?
2. What will I do today to help the Development Team meet the Sprint Goal?
3. Do I see any impediment that prevents me or the Development Team from meeting the Sprint Goal?
Why Scrum still needs Scru…

Building Axon.ivy Projects on Bitbucket Pipelines

Read me if you don't know what Axon.ivy (Ivy) is.
Motivation - Ivy projects are designed to be built on a continuous integration (CI) server like Jenkins
- Today, Bitbucket supports for CI with Bitbucket Pipelines
- We're using Bitbucket. Then, why not? It must be very cool and convenient for us if we can centralize our CI and VCS (version control system) tools in one place.
Here is an approach We have to use a maven plugin called project-build-plugin to build ivy projects. This plugin requires an instance of Ivy engine during building time.
Bitbucket Pipelines allows us to specify our own docker image as a build environment. What we need to do  is to prepare our docker image with needed stuffs such as JDK, Maven, Ivy engine, etc. Step 1. Prepare Docker images For testing purpose, I already created two docker images: Maven and Axon.ivy engine. They are now available on Docker Hub

This image for Maven using Oracle JDK 8
This image for Axon.ivy Engine 7.0.1

Step 2. Configure Maven…

Java 8 - Persistent data structure

The following is a series of posts about "functional programming in Java" which is the result of my understanding by reading the book "Java 8 in Action: Lambdas, Streams, and Functional-style Programming, by Alan Mycroft and Mario Fusco".
1. Why functional programming?
2. Functional programming in Java 8
3. Java 8 - Using Functions as Values
4. Java 8 - Persistent data structure
Persistent data structure is also known as a simple technique but it's very important. Its other names are functional data structure and immutable data structure.
Why is it "persistent"? Their values persist and are isolated from changes happening elsewhere. That's it!
This technique is described as below:

If you need a data structure to represent the result of a computation, you should make a new one and not mutable an existing data structure.

Destructive updates version
public static A doSomething(A a){ a.setProp1("new value"); return a; }
Functional versi…

JSF, Primefaces - Invoking Application Code Even When Validation Failed

A use case I have a form which has requirements as follow:
- There are some mandatory fields.
- Validation is triggered when changing value on each field.
- A button "Next" is enable only when all fields are entered. It turns to disabled if any field is empty.
My first approach I defined a variable "isDisableNext" at a backend bean "Controller" for dynamically disabling/enabling the "Next" button by performing event "onValueChange", but, it had a problem:
<h:form id="personForm"> <p:outputLabel value="First Name" for="firstName"/> <p:inputText id="firstName" value="#{person.firstName}" required="true"> <p:ajax event="change" listener="#{controller.onValueChange}" update="nextButton"/> </p:inputText> <p:outputLabel value="Last Name" for="lastName"/> <p:inputText …

Java 8 - Using Functions as Values

The following is a series of posts about "functional programming in Java" which is the result of my understanding by reading the book "Java 8 in Action: Lambdas, Streams, and Functional-style Programming, by Alan Mycroft and Mario Fusco".
1. Why functional programming?
2. Functional programming in Java 8
3. Java 8 - Using Functions as Values
4. Java 8 - Persistent data structure
In general, the phrase "functional-style programming" means the behavior of functions should be like that of mathematical-style functions - no side effects.

In programmers' point of views, functions may be used like other values: passed as arguments, returned as result, and stored in data structures. That means we can use the :: operator to create a method reference, and lambda expressions to directly express function values. For example:
//method reference Function<String, Integer> strToInt = Integer::parseInt; //lambda expression Comparator<Integer> comparator =…

Functional programming in Java 8

In my previous post, we discussed about why we should consider to use functional programming. Now, let's delve into what functional programming in Java is.
What is pure functional programming?Shortly, functional programming is programming using functions. A function corresponds to a mathematical function such as log, sin. Basically, it takes zero or more arguments, give one or more result, and has no side effects.
We can't completely program in pure functional style in Java Why?  For example, calling Scanner.nextLine twice typically gives different result.

So, it's just called "functional-style programming". How is that?
- There is no mutating structures visible to callers. That means your side effect may not be visible to a program, but it's visible to the programmer in terms of slower execution.
- A function or method shouldn't throw any exceptions (follows the concept "pass arguments, return result"). We can use types like Optional<T> i…